North Peru bird bestiary

by Gunnar Engblom on December 27, 2012

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More birds – North Peru

Photographer Max Waugh, who was with us on the Marvelous Spatuletail Display Tour in January 2012,  actually sent me a bunch of pictures from North Peru, apart from the Marvelous Spatuletail shots I posted in the last blogpost. Additionally, Alex Durand came back from two North Peru trips practically in a row with loads of great shots. So just to remind you  (hint, hint) of 17 good reasons to sign up for a North Peru trip, here is a North Peru Bird bestiary.

Sparkling Violetear Colibri coruscansSparkling Violetear by Max Waugh

Although, the Sparkling Violetear is very common through-out the Andes, it is a magnificent and very photogenic hummer.  Photo: Max Waugh.

Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan Andigena hypoglaucaGray-breasted Mountain-Toucan by Max Waugh

Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan is a spectacular bird. We usually find it near Leimebamba.

Marañon Crescentchest Melanopareia maranonicaMaranon Crescentchest Melanopareia maranonica Alex Durand

Crescentchests belongs to the Tapaculo family. They are very colorful. The Marañon Crescentchest is practically endemic to Peru, although it has recently been found across the Ecuadorian border at Zumba.  It differs from Elegant Crescentchest of the West slope, which we also see on the North Peru trips, by prominent white markings in the wing and richer orange below.
Photo: Alex Durand.

West Peruvian Screech Owl Megascops roboratus pacificus
West Peruvian Screech Owl Megascops roboratus pacificus Alex Durand

The Peruvian Screech-owl Otus roboratus consists of two subspecies roboratus of the Marañon valley and pacificus in woodlands on the Peruvian and Ecuadoran west slope of the Andes.  Here is pacifcus, which is much smaller than roboratus, photographed at Chaparri Eco Lodge by Alex Durand.

Tumbes Tyrant Tumbesia salvini
Tumbes Tyrant Tumbesia salvini. Photo: Alex Durand.

Tumbes Tyrant is a pretty and active little tyrant closely related to Chat-tyrants. It is endemic to the Tumbesian region and has only recently been recorded in Ecuador on the boarder to Peru.  We often see it at Chaparri or the White-winged Guan site called Quebrada Frejolillo. Photo: Alex Durand.

Emerald Toucanet  Aulacorhynchus prasinusEmerald Toucanet Aulacorhynchus prasinus photo Max Waugh

Emerald Toucanet  is sometimes regarded as 7 species The form in Peru belongs to Black-throated Toucanet Aulacorhynchus (prasinus) atrogularis. Photo by Max Waugh.

Purple-throated Sunangel Heliangelus viola.Purple-throated Sunangel Heliangelus viola. Photo: Max Waugh.

Purple-throated Sunangel is another lovely hummingbird from North Peru. Perhaps it is easiest to see in Leimebamba at the feeders of KentiKafé. But it can also be seen around Pomacochas. Photo: Max Waugh.

Golden-tailed Sapphire  Chrysuronia oenoneGolden-tailed Sapphire  Chrysuronia oenone. Photo; Max Waugh

This beautiful Golden-tailed Sapphire is photographed at Wakanqui near Moyobamba. Up to 18 species of Hummingbirds visit the feeders. It is truly spectacular. Photo: Max Waugh.

Ecuadorian Piculet Picumnis sclateri.Ecuadorian Piculet Picumnis scaleteri. Photo: Alex Durand

Piculets are diminutive small woodpeckers. And they are cute! North Peru has 3 species which are regularly seen, but sometimes hard to photograph. Alex Durand manage to photograph all three. Here is the Ecuadorian Piculet  which we usually see at the White-winged Guan spot near Olmos.

Speckle-chested Piculet Picumnis steindachneri Speckle-chested Piculet male - Alex Durand-001

Speckle-chested Piculet Picumnis steindachneri ALex Durand

The Speckle-chested Piculet has a very small range. It is endemic to Amazonas and San Martin departments in Peru. It is often seen at Afluentes near Abra Patricia, but it seems even more common along the Utcubamba river between Pedro Ruiz and Leimebamba. Here are photos of both male and female. Photos: Alex Durand.

Lafresnaye’s Piculet Picumnis lafresnayiLafresnaye's Piculet Picumnis lafresnayi. Photo: Alex Durand.

Lafresnaye’s Piculet can be found near Tarapoto. It is a lowland piculet and is quite common in the northern Amazon. Photo: Alex Durand.

Golden-headed Quetzal Pharomachrus auricepsGolden-headed Quetzal  Pharomacrus auriceps. Photo: Max Waugh

Some non-birders find it a bit surprising that there are Quetzals also in South America. They are just not Resplendent like in Costa Rica. There are three species in Peru. Two in the highlands and one in the lowland. Of the highland ones, the Golden-headed Quetzal is the most common. Photo: Max Waugh.

White-necked Jacobin Florisuga melivora.White-necked Jacobin Florisuga melivora. Photo: Max Waugh

White-necked Jacobin is a quite common Hummingbird in many parts of South America. It is nonetheless still a splendid species. This shot was taken at Wakanqui  near Moyobamba. Photo: Max Waugh.

Pale-billed Antpitta Grallaria carrikeri.Pale-billed Antpitta Grallaria carrikeri- Alex Durand

Pale-billed Antpitta is perhaps one of the most enigmatic Antpittas in Peru. It used to be very difficult. Now however it is staked out above on Rio Chido headland near San Lorenzo – not far from Pomacochas. It lives in dense Chusquea bamboo patches.  Photo: Alex Durand.

Lulu’s Tody-Flycatcher Poecilotriccus luluaeLulu's Tody-Flycatcher or Johnson's Tody-Flycatcher Poecilotriccus luluae. Photo: Max Waugh

Beautiful little bird endemic to the dense scrub around Abra Patricia.  It takes some time and patience to see it, but it responds well to playback.  It is also known as Johnson’s Tody-Flycatcher.  Photo: Max Waugh

Long-whiskered Owlet Xenoglaux loweryi.Long-whiskered Owlet Xenoglaux loweryi. Photo: Alex Durand

Perhaps the most spectacular and the most enigmatic of all South American Owls. This was a bird which after its discovery in the seventies was not seen in the field by birders until 2007. Now it is regularly seen at the Owlet Lodge at Abra Patricia.  Photo: Alex Durand.

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Happy New Year! 

Gunnar  Engblom

Connect with Gunnar on Facebook or Twitter or kolibriexp@gmail.com

 

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

juan chalco December 28, 2012 at 9:35 pm

Gunnar,
Aqui puedes ver algunas fotos…
http://www.flickr.com/photos/28451642@N03/page9/
saludos,

Juan Chalco

Kota Kinabalu Travel January 2, 2013 at 5:37 am

Your shots are amazing! And the birds are beautiful! I love the Sparkling Violetear the most – surreal!

Roger Burrows January 8, 2013 at 12:16 pm

I just wished I lived closer to Peru. Air fares are a real problem for anyone living in Atlantic Canada as getting to Peru costs almost as much as joining a tour. For anyone on a fixed income enjoying these photos is as close as you get!

Debbie Blair January 14, 2013 at 6:37 am

Some amazing photos here, brings back a lot of memories and show me some fantastic birds that I haven’t seen yet. I hope to get back someday for another birding trips Gunnar. The photos are very tantalizing. Mr. Waugh’s photos depicts the essence of those beautiful birds!…….and of course I love Alex’s photos too!

Lugares Turisticos del Peru January 20, 2013 at 8:29 am

Amazing Photos. I remeber Peru and its amazing place to watch birdr. The Northt of Peru its tehe best. I have to go there.

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