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Not a waste of time!

Social Media for birdersI think I know what many birders who are still not on Facebook or blogging think. Social Media is a waste of time and it will only result in less time for birding. Can’t be bothered with that!

I was thinking the same thing a year and a half ago.  Therefor, I challenge you to read through this article and follow this course-workshop. Give it a chance! It is winter in the northern hemisphere so you may just have a little bit more time now to actually find out WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT!

31 day Social Media workshop for birders

The workshop (I prefer to name it workshop instead of course as I also will be learning) will run for 31 days on my blog. There  will not be a daily post. More likely 3-4 post per week, so you will have time to contemplate what you have learned. You will learn how to use social media more effectively and specifically for birders and for birding related companies. Here are a few topics.

  • Listservers
  • Facebook for birders
  • Twitter for birders – including rare bird alerts.
  • Forums.
  • YouTube – sharing bird videos.
  • Flickr and photo-sharing. Building a photo guide of the birds of the world.
  • Stumble Upon, Digg, Reddit, Delcious and other social bookmarking services.
  • Blogging. Would you like to have 100s of visitors daily to your blog?

This birding network that you will create using these tools will give you an enormous advantages anytime you look for an answer on a birding question, and ID problem, advice to buy a birding gadget or if you look how to bird a new destination more effectively and less expensively. Birding news will reach you fast and there may even be applications for Rare Bird Alerts.

Part of the resistance to Social Media among birders is that they feel they are doing quite well with the existing channels. It is hard to see the benefit of something new if you haven’t tried it…and if you try it and your mates are not on and it take ages until you actually find a lot of other birders to engage with, it becomes a bit boring and you will leave your Facebook and Twitter without activity, convinced it is not for you.

I understand you perfectly. Social Media will appear as a waste of time.  But say we get 1000 participants to this course/workshop and we all started to connect between us, start to share what we have learned about social media with our existing network who are not following the workshop. If each of us have some 50 connections in average, it means the network can reach 50 000 birders. That is for starters. With the expansion of Facebook this is already happening and with 10 years millions of birders will effectively be connected this way. If we look at the same equations regarding how birders can become more effective in conservation issues and how we can recruit a new generation of birders, Social Media become the means to achieve this.

My background

I have been on Facebook for some 21 months and on Twitter for 18 months. Both have served to connect with other birders.

I have been blogging for about a year regularly on this site. I had blogged before, but a year ago, I moved my Blogger blog to be housed on my company site and I became part of the community of bloggers at NatureBlog Network. I realized then that frequent blogging could be a way to get more birders also find my commercial site.

Soon I also realized that both Twitter and Facebook were excellent tools to tell others about my blog – and thus indirectly my business.

In spite of these early notions, I worry much less about driving traffic to my commercial site today, but rather just blog on topics that I believe will be interesting to other birders. In the end, anyone interested in the commercial part of my web-site will find it looking in the about pages. I have no need to glue it to your face. In the end, you may – or may not – chose to purchase what I offer, but it will often be after we already have gotten to know each other.

One thing that has become very clear to me as I have been on this journey, is that birders in general know very little about why social media can be just mind-blowing for birders. This, I think, is the main objective with this workshop. To show you why Social Media for birders rocks!!

Three Social Media Mantras

When social media is best, there are three pillars – three main rules to live by.

  • Listen
  • Engage
  • Share

Remember this as your Mantra. You shall hear those words again and again.

Sign up

The workshop will be published on my blog, but in order to know immediately when a post have been posted you should sign up for the Social Media for birders challenge filling in the form below. In these messages there will also be specific tasks for you to complete so you can put your achieved new knowledge into practice. It is through the mailing list that we shall be building a community. By signing up and saving all the messages in a specific folder you shall have all the items ready at hand when you need them for reference.
Finally, please share the link to this page with as many birders you know. We will come out stronger after this, building connections for conservation, for recruiting new members to the birding community, for finding info on birding in foreign countries including local guides and operators, for getting the ID:s on your photographed mystery birds, for helping newcomers to get into the hobby without get turned off before even gotten started because now they have access to more experienced birders.

Now sign-up, please!

Here is an updated post with some more justification to share the news about this workshop and also contains a disclaimer which reveals my motives to organize this event for FREE!

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How to read a blog carnival!

iandthebirdlogoolive-largeSo you participated in a blog carnival! Do you read the other posts in the blog carnival you participated in. What? You rarely have time?  In this carnival there are 23 blogs represented.  How long time does it take to read one? Usually not that long. Maybe two minutes each. Do you have 46 minutes to spare – and maybe half a minute to comment each blog? This is how to read and comment the entire I and the bird in 59 min. Obviously, you may use this same strategy if you are not participating in IATB  to read and comment – or you can use the same strategy to other blog carnivals or my birdbloggers Tweet-club (new edition coming shortly..sorry for the delay).

23 blogs read and commented in 59 minutes.

Materials needed:

  • A large Screen so you can have two windows opened at once.
  • A mouse or scroll pad
  • a timer
  • open a note pad on the screen and fill in four rows
    your name
    email
    blog address of your blog
    I really liked the picture of ….

This is to copy and paste fast to the fields in the blog comment form.

Step by step instructions.

  1. Open I and the bird #114 by Susan Myers in a new window – not a just a tab.
  2. Press ctrl with one finger as you scroll the cursor (with the mouse or scroll pad) over each link and click left for each. One by one the blogs will open in new tabs. Start from the bottom, so my blogpost comes first! (Just kidding!!)
  3. set the timer on 2 minutes 30 seconds – and start with the first tab.
  4. Check the title and the photos first. Here you get an idea what the blog is about. If the topic is not very interesting to you…give it a very brief treatment …but still leave a comment of something likable you have detected. Use your notepad to copy and past to the comment section and say something nice regarding one of the photos.
  5. Now repeat 3 and 4 with the next tab.’

Let me know if this strategy worked in the comment section below.

The future of “I and the bird” blog carnival

Still, even with this sound approach it is a bit overwhelming with so many blogposts in one place. Also, it is not an easy task to host a blog carnival. There are so many good birding blogs now on Natureblog Network, so in reality there should not be too difficult to find a host for IATB. Still, there are often a bit desperate call for more hosts – and this probably has to do with that many old-timers simply feel it takes too much time and effort to host.

Recent IATB I have participated in have had many weaknesses. First of all, they don’t produce that many visits to my web-page. Usually only around 5 hits.  Secondly, some of the material is really dull. The idea is that the bloggers should give examples of their best blogging posts. Hand on the heart, was that your best post you just submitted? Thirdly, there are too many posts included that lose focus of the hosting blog and scare off the regular visitors rather than the other way around.  In the end it is only the same bloggers that will check out if their post made it. Some may read a few blogs – or at least comment that they intend to and never to open the carnival post again.  It is the same circus and participants over and over again and the same people that comment.

Questions to ask yourself

Who are you blogging for and why are you participating in blog carnivals? Was it not because y0u wanted to reach new audiences?

I think, if I may give my opinion, that IATB is in need of some new guidelines. It is not for me to impose of course, but a discussion on the topic may be fruitful. Here are my suggestions. Please give your thoughts in the comment section.

  • Let the host select his favorites and maybe even rank them. If the blog host does not include all posts, there will be more interest from the participant to provide a post that is in the liking of the host and suits his blog well. After all, the whole idea is to get the usual reader of the blog to discover new blogs and this will not happen if there is no connection to the hosts interest and style.
    If the host is Singapore Nature Club, what point is there to have 6 posts about birds at feeders in the US on this blog carnival? Most US bloggers would have a hard time getting selected by the Singapore host.  A blogger from the US would have much better chance of acceptance if he/she rather included a blog post with great photos of colorful or impressive birds such as Cardinal, BlueJay, Bald Eagle and Gold-Finch and a title like “The five most mind-blowing beautiful birds of North Americans”.
  • Give a tweetable headline and a short url so that the individual reader can re-tweet a post that he/she has liked
  • include a picture from each selected blog with the link.
  • Maybe, in fairness to the poor bloggers that did not make it to the top 10, 15 or 20 or whatever, one could make a second post containing a list of the blogposts that did not make it, with title and short url, so at least there is a back-link provided. Saying something like: Here is a follow-up to yesterday’s IATB with a list of the posts that did not make it to be included in my selection. This does not mean they are not of interest, only that they did fit this time.

Now shoot me!

Related posts regarding Blog Carnivals and the Tweet-club.

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  • Once in a while, one reads a blogpost that is well worth sharing. Just popped at Jochen's irregular blog This is funny! http://bit.ly/58Mc3H #
  • One Would Think This Would Be A Given http://bit.ly/5z4olz #
  • Dan Tallman commented my blog about Pishtacos with an account from bird expeditions in Carpish in the 70s. Great read. http://bit.ly/8RvAS0 #
  • Which are the top 3 birds you want to see in Peru? http://bit.ly/61ZWYJ #
  • Anyone seen the Great White Shark or the Killer Whale? Swimming with sealions. Unsustainable eco-tourism from Lima. http://bit.ly/7SvHbK/ #
  • Upload bird pictures and links about Peru on Kolibri Expeditions Facebook page http://bit.ly/5wGxff #
  • Take part in the 10,000 Birds give aways. 10000 Birds Conservation Club http://bit.ly/6ThST4 #
  • Like to win an annual subscription… http://bit.ly/6L4Bzf #
  • I ask yo u again. Which are the top 3 birds you want to see in Peru? http://bit.ly/61ZWYJ #
  • How long will this continue? Swimming with sealions. Unsustainable eco-tourism near Lima, Peru. http://bit.ly/7SvHbK/ #
  • Adopt a threatened species this Christmas: The charity is selling sponsorship packs which allow people to 'adopt' t… http://bit.ly/4FTotS #

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The tweetclub is better than blog carnivals.

Tweet club logo.The birdwatchers tweetclub is much better to get visits to your blog post than the traditional blog carnivals. Have a look at this weeks tweet club results. WOW!!! It is the most overwhelming result since its start. Many blogposts have gotten over 200 clicks! Check this!!

In most these results were added to posts already having been posted a while and already been published on Twitter and to your blog readers.

Some participants don’t stick to the rules.

You must understand that this is a collective effort. You need to retweet all the other posts if you want the benefit to be in receiving end of traffic. There is no need to single out anyone. I was quite lenient in accepting people this week to participate, as I was keen to get the tweet club started again. The tweet club is new, so it may not be all that clear to everyone how it works.

I ask you to check the earlier posts from the tweet club to grasp the ideas behind it. In any case here is a short summery of 3 main rules.

  1. You must have a Twitter acount with people interested in birds as followers. I have not set a minimum number of followers, but lets say for the sake of argument that at least 10 of those people following you are interested in birds.
  2. During the week you commit to do minimum 10 retweets of  individual posts. Best of course if you tweet each posts twice. But you commit only to 10 tweets in total.  I personally tweet each post 3 times.
  3. Use the bit.ly link that I provide. This is needed to be able to measure the number of clicks each post receives.

Share on Facebook

Birdbloggers should share more on Facebook. In spite of mentioning the effectiveness of Facebook sharing and a requirement for anyone who had not yet large Twitter numbers, noone even shared one post. Believe me it is amazing the results you can get this way. Let’s do a test. I will post once a day from tomorrow the four best results from the past tweet club (Larry, Kim, Susan and Janet). When you see the post on my wall, share it on your wall. By the publication of the next tweet club, if  Larrry, Kim, Susan and Janet could check how many extra clicks they get (install google analytics or just the wordpress stats for those on WordPress).

This weeks participants.

  • RT@LadyWoodpecker Birding on Westham Island (Spot the Decoy) http://bit.ly/12elpN. (Had 122 hits prior to tweetclub launch)
  • RT @HooootOwl Check out the Broken wing act by this Killdeer. http://bit.ly/12Ofo5. (Had 25 hits prior to tweetclub launch)
  • RT @irenapuella If you are stuck in Sumba and already seen the bird endemics, waddayado? Go to the races.!! http://bit.ly/IMMXH
  • RT @journowl Brandt’s  Cormorant – A rock of guttural croaks.  A photo session. http://bit.ly/3DrmtX. (Had 58 hits prior to tweetclub launch)
  • RT@soaringfalcon1 Meet the Birds of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge http://bit.ly/ZyekK
  • RT @PatBumstead Pellet Puzzle: What’s On Owl’s Menu? http://bit.ly/1Gow7y
  • RT @Kolibrix Updated Interview w the most popular bird blogger  @grrlscientists (Devorah Bennu). Join her in Manu Dec 6. http://bit.ly/vyq4H

That is folks. Please leave your next contribution for Tweet Club in the comment section below. Now when my newsletter is out, it hope we shall be back next week as usual. Deadline on Tuesday Oct 20. Share on Twitter and on Facebook.  Let’s see if anyone can get 300 clicks this week.

Twitter image by creative Commons lisence on Flickr.  Photo credit: Adam Gutierrez
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Your favorite Tweet Club is back.

Twitter club for birders. We need a better logo! Could anyone please come up with something?

Twitter club for birders. We need a better logo! Could anyone please come up with something?

Not as long delay this time, but still delayed. I hope to be able to get the tweetclub #006 out by next Thursday Oct 1, so please submit your contributions in the comment section below before Tuesday Sep 29 . See earlier tweet-club postings to understand the rules and how this works.

I am having somewhat difficult time to get enough participants in the tweet-club in spite of the overwhelming results. Some of you may think it comes off as a bit spammy, but in reality for those of us on Twitter who follow more than 100 people have a hard time to actually see all things that are relevant. Therefore, highlighting blogposts about birds that have been selected by the individual birdblogger and additionally have past my “filter” (strictly commercial posts or non-bird related posts will not pass) guarantees excellent reading and posts you don’t want to miss. You also have a chance to spread your blog to people who don’t regularly would read your blog. I have around 4600 followers on Twitter.  Quite obviously not all are birders, but if we could provide interesting blogposts about birds that have lots of wow-factor in them (I repeat great photos, something very funny, a great story, something useful, a top 1o list, a tutorial etc have the chance to reach far more people that you usually reach) then we can also engage more people to maybe become birders and ultimately active guardians of nature.

Facebook-club for Bird Bloggers.

I have talked about this idea in previous posts. Now it is time to introduce it here as a fixed strategy. Some explaining: From the past tweet-club results I have picked those that got over 100 clicks and presented these on my Facebook (some 1800 Facebook Friends – mostly birders). Unfortunately, it I can’t measure my out-going links from Facebook (if it is possible – let me know!), but it ought to be significant. If you have a great story or photo it may even be re-Facebooked by some of friends. For a specialized hobby like ours and with the relatively few birders on Twitter, Facebook reaches more birders. Twitter can reach more people and especially people that may have a beginning interest in nature watching. Facebook reaches the already converted souls and the friends of friends. The two compliment each other. It is therefore logical to take the Tweet-club also to Facebook.

A few things to think about.
1. By publishing links to other bloggers, you will appear less navel-gazing and self promoting. Sure, Facebook in itself is a self-promoting media, but your Facebook friends will love you even more if you not only promote yourself.
2. But, don’t overdo it. Only share things you truly like.
3. Share the link only once or at the most twice if you posted at an odd hour and get very few responses.  Since Facebook is an mutual opt-in social media system it means that most those who are following you as Facebook Friends are truly interested in you and contrary to Twitter will read almost every update.

Newbies on the Tweetclub

We have some new participants for this weeks tweet-club. I have chosen posts from their blogs since they either did not supply a specific blogpost, it was not about birds or it contained a stream that can’t be seen in some countries. Sorry to these bloggers for that inconvenience.

Here are the tweets you should retweet (and of course read and comment).

  • RT @Journowl The cheaper sex ……for Imperial Eagle http://bit.ly/62uWo
  • RT @JKissnHug Very confident Sandhill Cranes were raising young in popular Michigan park  http://bit.ly/Zzceg
  • RT @SoaringFalcon1 The burrowing owl is threatened in California. Larry Jordan gives all the background.  http://bit.ly/4zbY24 (had 104 hits prior to tweetclub launch)
  • RT @irenapuella Great shots of Asian Owls http://bit.ly/3sJcbt (had 16 tweets for this link before launch.
  • RT @ falconmountain Pallid Harrier in Finland. Good flight photos. http://bit.ly/3AP6Fk
  • RT @NC_N8 Everyone has heard about the Christmas Bird Count! What a bout the Fall Bird Count? http://bit.ly/27oxtv
  • RT @2birderstogo Nothing like a jay to lift your spirits and cure your ills. http://bit.ly/fpqjj
  • RT @kolibrix Do you want to birdwatch in Manu, Peru and support the indigenous communities get into eco-tourism? http://bit.ly/OdIiZ
  • RT @LadyWoodpecker Last day of summer. What to do? Go birding on the shore of course http://bit.ly/myPv1

I also had contributions from BirdExplorers and Dani in Catalunya, but since I got no twitter account from neither, I can not include them. Please submit again next week.

Last tweet club results.

The results from tweet club 4 were a bit more modest than usual, but both long delivery time of the blogpost as well as rather few participants gave lower numbers.

@SoaringFalcon1 http://bit.ly/2Dr2W 36 clicks
@kolibrix http://bit.ly/25Qeo 59 clicks
@DawnFine http://bit.ly/M4C0K 64 clicks
@birdfreak http://bit.ly/FGKrE 66 clicks
@journowl htp://bit.ly/9ryLS 73 clicks
@gwendolen http://bit.ly/34XjO 85 clicks

Gwendolen’s Vulture call got most clicks.

Leave contributions for next weeks tweet-club. Contributions by Tuesday, por favor.

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How to credit when credit is due on Twitter?

Say you see a funny phrase on Twitter as I did yester day and you want to retweet it. This phrase was so cute but it had no RT prefix crediting someone in specific.

I tried to search for the term on www.twitter.com, but although I got  page after page with hits there is no immediate way to find the first mention.  The tweets containing this phrase is ordered with the latest mention first, but it would take me endless clicking page per page to get to the first, if ever.

Desired search fucntions on Twitter.

Two things really. As indicated above getting a search of say the 100 first mentions for a phrase would be great.

Another variant on the same theme would be to search for tweets on a specific date and time of day.

Why? If not for anything else, to be able to give credit to the right person. If you come up with something really catchy, someone else would not take the credit as easily.

Here is a twitterism that I thought I came up with first. But after doing some searches on on the internet I found several that predates mine.

I twitter, therefore I am.

However, my friend Kathy Licari countered on Facebook, which must be a first:

“I don’t Twitter, therefore I am…..not?”

Ha, ha!!!

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Whither StumbleUpon

Stumble UponTwo weeks ago Mike Bergin of NatureBlogNetwork (also of 10000birds) put out a question to the naturebloggers whether Stumble Upon and other Social Media bookmarking services actually bring any traffic to their sites. Check the post and the discussion here! The consensus was that while Stumble Upon can have immense effect on giving traffic, most naturebloggers don’t use it or the results are not giving permanent readers, only sudden peaks. Naturally, it is hard to measure who will become a new regular reader of the blog and from where he/she is recruited. Therefore, I think there is a value also in such a sudden peak of readers that have reached your blog from the less regular outlets,  than those you have among your friends and followers on Facebook and Twitter and your regular RSS feed reader. You may convert one or two to a regular reader. Furthermore, Stumble upon has a Birding index, why birding articles can be labeled (tagged) correctly (contrary to for example Digg!).

Yet another Social Media experiement for birdbloggers.

The tweetclub for birdbloggers I started two weeks ago has had some interesting effects on visits to the participating blogs. I want to do a new experiment. I have dusted off an old post about NatureBlogging previously submitted to SU, that probably most of you have read already.  I am reposting it again on Twitter and my Facebook and ask my followers/friends to hit “thumbs up”, if they like.  Instead of giving the direct link to my post, I give the Stumble Upon link in bit.ly fashion. This is the link you shall click to get to the submitted test post: http://bit.ly/ApiST.   This way it is really easy to show your SU feeling about the particular post. It seems OK to do it this way on Twitter, but it looks very ugly on Facebook. But remember that this is a test. Please try it and if you are already a member of Facebook, consider writing a short review.

The StumbleUpon club for birdbloggers.

If this works the way I think it may work, the idea would be to have around 30 birdbloggers submitting one of their best all time (timeless) birding posts and submit it to the Birdbloggers Stumble Upon club. I imagine a blog with a great jawdropping picture prominent in the blog will get more stumbles. One selected post will be stumbled once per day by all members. There should be one post stumbled per day for a month  We shall also try to twitter and facebook those posts that are in our liking.  That is the outline to the idea. Let’s see how the experiment goes first.

If you liked this post, check out these related posts regarding the Birdbloggers TweetClub.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/topgold/ / CC BY 2.0
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First Birdbloggers Tweet Club

Tweetclub-AdamHey, we’ve done it. This is a follow-up on my post on July 8 announcing the tweet club.

There are 14 birdbloggers tweetclub posts this 1st week. Starting with a late start. I won’t go into why this was not published Monday, as promised as that would fill on other blog post. Let me just summarize that we are dealing with high season birding tours in Peru and that my wife is almost due to have a baby any day now. My obligations are elsewhere, as you probably can appreciate. I did however, send off the first batch of tweets last night as some of you may have seen. So the ball is rolling. Be sure to read this long post to the end, because we shall take this idea to Facebook as well.

Birdbloggers Tweet Club rules

  1. Commit to retweet at least 10 of the tweets below.
  2. If you can, pls retweet up to 3 times over the week on different days and times.
  3. Read the blogs you retweet. Remember, that the blogs you retweet are your personal recommendations.
  4. Consider re-writing the tweets in a personal way, if my interpretation is not in your liking or if you want a personal touch in your re-tweet.
  5. You may just retweet a seed tweeted by someone else if you prefer.
  6. You may or may not include the @reply of the web-owner in the tweet. It is not technically a retweet of course just copying the below and you are not re-tweeting an original message to Twitter, so you may well take credit for your first seed yourself. This also gives more space for your followers to retweet and maintain your credit.
  7. I have decided not to include a hashtag for the tweetclub. You can use hashtags such as #ecomonday, #birdsaturday, #birding etc in the tweet to give it more exposure.

Concerns and tips

Dawn Fine raised an interesting point. How can we do this without becoming spammers on Twitter?  I think it is only an issue for those followers you may have that  follow less than 50 people and 14 of those followers are the same birdbloggers here.  In most cases many tweets will be lost in the Twitter stream. You reader may not see the tweet the first time it is sent. Many “retweets” make sure everyone that could be interested in reading the post will get exposed to it. What is more, your post will be seen by a lot of people that are not following you presently, and this is the main benefit when birding blogs go viral.  In any case, we should be aware of the potential risk of coming off as spammers and raise a flag if you notice it becoming a problem.

The main recommendation though is that you are honest to yourself. You shouldn’t retweet something that you have not read. Retweeting is like recommending, so therefore the posts you are re-tweeting are seen as your personal recommendations.

Don’t retweet the exact message here below if you are not in agreement with the article or if you don’t like it.

This could also teach us to write more interesting blogposts. If you want readers to your blog, you have to understand that you are not writing for your personal joy only, but for your reader. This will make a shift in what you write about. Soon you find yourself writing posts of stuff that you think will interest a lot of people. Those posts will have a natural place here on the tweet club. If you find after this exercise that your post gets less click than the others, this may well be a hint to you. Don’t take it personal, but let it be an inspiration to write more interesting posts to your readers.

Twitter is also about reciprocals. Retweeting somebody’s blogpost is a much better way of saying thank you for a Retweet, than just publicly say thanks.

How to read 14 blogposts in 15 minutes.

Another point Dawn raises is how on earth shall anyone have time to read all these posts. We are all very busy. Most browsers today allow you to open multiple tabs. Click on your browser program to get a totally new window and open this blog post there. Then click on one bit.ly link one after the other while holding the ctrl key pressed. It should be no problem open 10 to 15 tabs at one go. Then spend up to 1 minute on each post. This should be enough to see if you like the post or not.
What bloggers should try to remember to get retweeted is:

  • a good photo to start with that catches the eye. The old saying “a photo is worth a 1000 words” applies in blogging.
  • a very catchy title
  • good headlines for the sub-sections in the blog.

Does retweeting work?

These were the posts that had most clicks of those that I retweeted in the last I and the Bird #104, which appeared in two parts. The first part described the idea of using twitter as a means to spread the word about the blog carnival and the individual posts that were presented in a tweetable fashion similar to what we are doing here.  The second part also included a photo from each blog and some statistics from the first twitter session. I retweeted all posts twice.  The most popular posts got these many hits because they were retweeted by many others.  This is what we want to achieve also with the tweet club. Here are the results as of today from the I and the bird post.

  1. Have you ever seen 50000 Purple Martins falll from the sky? Check out the video on this site. http://bit.ly/GdMEN
    Tweeted first at 06.00 July 8: 102 clicks.
  2. I bet you never seen a Yellow-breasted Grosbeak. It’s not in the book, yet here is a photo. http://bit.ly/3MbcA4
    Tweeted first at 21.20 July 8: 94 clicks.
  3. Here is the punkiest of all chicks. I don’t know if this is cute or ugly. What do you think? http://bit.ly/U7QGJ
    Tweeted first at 09.00 July 8: 91 clicks.
  4. Barred Eagle-owl takes a monkey in Singapore. Impressive! http://bit.ly/hTzF4
    Tweeted first at 18.50 July 7: 82 clicks.
  5. The puffin is the Toucan of the Northern seas with that colorful beak. Check these smashing photos. http://bit.ly/wYwbq
    Tweeted first at 08.00 July 8: 70 clicks.

Two things to think about when studying the content of the above links. You may notice that I seldom use the titles of the original blog post. When tweeting it is useful to use tricks to catch the attention in the tweetstream. Use big words and superlatives when appropriate. I have no idea if they were 50000 Purple Martins but they were a hell of a lot, and the number sounds appropriate to what I could see, even though they may have been 20000 or perhaps 70000.  But it is obvious that the tweet title worked. Think about this when posting your next blogpost to twitter.
Secondly, what role do you think the photos played  to get visitors to the post?  Certainly post 3-5 ranked this high due to the photos provided.

Tweetclub tweets #001

Here are the 14 participants of this week.

  • RT @docforestal Many bird photos and a checklist of the birds seen at Moosehead Lake, Maine http://bit.ly/B0nvn
  • RT @gonolek This is  great literate memoir blogpost from Birdman partly about birding on Scilly  in late 70s.  http://bit.ly/11OL6p
  • RT @birdingdude Sheer madness or daring run? A twitch, as the Brits would say.  Mississippi Kite in NY http://bit.ly/ZT4Au
  • @DawnFine I can’t sleep at night. Flying squirrel and Whip-Poor-Will making too much noise. http://bit.ly/vIaxU
  • @journowl Endangered world’s heaviest parrot goes home http://bit.ly/kakapo (@journowl provided the link and it had 18 clicks prior to me posting the first tweet)
  • @soaringfalcon1: Great pics of Red-shouldered Hawk  and a video to learn its call.  http://bit.ly/3UTZ5k
  • @wrenaissance Slide show of  the cutest Barn Swallow chicks begging for food.  http://bit.ly/Qj855
  • @patbumstead It’s a new blog but will be a big one when it grows up! Canada’s National Bird.  http://bit.ly/I7KOF
  • @HastyBrook Bloggers and Tweeters meets Birds and Beers in Minnesota!! http://bit.ly/jZaTy
  • @babw Impressive digiscoping results from http://bit.ly/Dkp5E from Oregon
  • @jeffgyr: Want some good Karma? Join Jeff saving Red Knot by flipping Horseshoe Crabs. http://bit.ly/ar1OJ
  • @VickieHart Great photoblog about Hummingbird banding.  http://bit.ly/RfMpr
  • @Birdfreak Recommended books for birders – Birdfreak does a lot of birdbook reviews. Here is a summery. Check it out  http://bit.ly/1gRgem
  • @kolibrix The mightiest of all Eagles. The  Harpy Eagle.   http://bit.ly/UjqOx This link had 88 hits prior to participating here.

I have added the Twitter handle here. I suggest you follow each, but please note that you don’t have to include the handle in the tweet you do, as I explained above.  By following you can also check whether each fulfill the commitment! (Devilish, isn’t it?).

UPDATE: One great service to use for the re-tweets so it becomes less spammy. Spread them out in time with programmed tweets with Tweet Later. This is a great little app that is free of charge. You can schedule your tweets with this app. It is a great way to collect things you want to share for #ecomonday and #birdsaturday – and naturally a way to retweet birdbloggers tweet-club posts.

Why are all the links bit.ly?

Yes, I changed your links! Bit.ly gives a great tool to see how many clicks this exercise actually gives each and every blog. Just copy the bit.ly link and put it in your browser followed by a plus like this: http://bit.ly/1gRgem+  Cool, huh? This way we shall see which participants are getting most traffic.

Where to go from here? What about a Facebook blog-sharing club?

The other day, I came across Jeff Gordon’s blog about flipping horse shoe crabs, that he shared on his facebook wall. I had 12 people interacting directly on my wall, so that is immediately 12 people sent to Jeff’s blog  and there were probably more as not all those that clicked on the link may have put a comment or “like this” for the link.
Facebook is more effective in getting regular readers to your blog, because they are your friends, but they would be constantly the same people visiting. If you want to reach beyond that maybe we can use the same Twitter club strategy on Facebook. Well almost the same…

…Facebook is more closed than Twitter, so it is necessary to be more restricted in what you post. There are many of your best Facebook friends that will be reading every line you send so you don’t want to spam them with send every blog their way. Best to pick your favorites. On Sunday, I am going to pick the five most popular of the above posts and put them on my Facebook wall during the following week. You may do the same or you could just pick a few of those that you like.

There is an app on Facebook called NetworkedBlogs that many nature bloggers are signed up to, but very few actually use to share blogs of each other. The app is good for publishing your own blog to your wall so your friends see it and it does give a very easy share option. Be sure to use this share mechanism if anything interesting comes your way.  The app is a little bit flawed I think, because when you look at your own page in the app, it would be good to actually right here get the latest feed  from the blogs you follow, not only a list of the same blogs.

On Facebook are also the group of Birders who blog, tweet and chirp and the page Natureblognetwork. It is well worth to belong to both, but actual link sharing as of fetching links to put on your own wall is not part of the strategy.

In summery, it should work well to bring this experiment also to Facebook and it does not really compete with current blog promotion on Facebook, but rather would compliment well – as long as it is made in a moderate fashion.

Hosting the Tweet club in the future.

I like to host yet one or two more weeks to get the idea into form, but then turn over the hosting on a rotational manner such as I and the bird. Volunteers speak up! For

Twitter image by creative Commons lisence on Flickr.  Photo credit: Adam Gutierrez
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As you noticed the part 1, of the I and the bird was probably the wordiest ever without coming to the point – that is presenting the participants. That is why I decided to make a part 2.

Here are the posts participating in IATB #104.  Prior to publishing I decided to tweet each post at different hours of the day. The test is dual. First to see how many hits a tweet gets send a link of  the blog to Twitter. Secondly to test which time of day is best to tweet.

The results are presented at the end of this post.

Exquisite photos of the world’s most beautiful colorless warbler. 7 sec with a B&W Warbler.

Seven Seconds With a Black and White Warbler  by Lynne Schoenborn of Hasty Brook

Seven Seconds With a Black and White Warbler by Lynne Schoenborn of Hasty Brook

Forget about monopoly. Here is the ultimate board game for birders.

A birders Monopoly?  asks Patrick Belardo of Hawkowlsnest
A birder’s Monopoly? asks Patrick Belardo of Hawkowlsnest

Good Mourning Dove and other stunning bird photos at first light a summer morning.

Begin the day with birds. Mourning Dove at first light a summer morning. Photo: Dave Alcock of DaveA's Birding Blog

Baby Grebe on the back. Photo: Fiona Cohen of Nature Geek Northwest

Flying Jewels on the Texas Golf Coast.

Hummingbirds at Quintana Neotropical Bird Sanctuary. Photo: Kyle McCreary of As the mind Wanders
Hummingbirds at Quintana Neotropical Bird Sanctuary. Photo: Kyle McCreary of As the mind Wanders

How to paint the Bobolink and a video of its aerial display.

Bobolink by Jo of J.M. Odesluys
Bobolink by Jo of J.M. Odesluys

Did you know that pigeons give milk to their offspring?

The pigeon gives crop milk to the young. Photo: Susannah A. Lower Fraser of Wanderin Weeta
The pigeon gives crop milk to the young. Photo: Susannah A. Lower Fraser of Wanderin’ Weeta

Baby Grebes ride in the back… err.. ON the back!

Pied-billed Grebe, with baby Grebe on the back. Photo: Fiona Cohen of Nature Geek Northwest

Pied-billed Grebe, with baby Grebe on the back. Photo: Fiona Cohen of Nature Geek Northwest

Mama, Feed me now. I can Swallow anything. Wonderful Haiku!

Barn Swallow. Feed me mama. Photo: Wren of Wrenaissance reflections

Barn Swallow. Feed me mama. Photo: Wren of Wrenaissance reflections

Have you ever seen 50000 Purple Martins falll from the sky? Check out the video on this site.

Male Purple Martin. Photo: S. Halpin of PurpleMartins-R-Us.com. There are Martins everywhere on the Video. Check it out.

Male Purple Martin. Photo: S. Halpin of PurpleMartins-R-Us.com. There are Martins everywhere on the Video. Check it out.

Fantastic flight shots of New Zealand Falcon by National Geography photographer Rob Suisted

New Zealand Falcon. Photo: Rob Suisted of Natures Pic Images BlogNew Zealand Falcon. Photo: Rob Suisted of Nature’s Pic Images Blog

The Puffin is the Toucan of the Northern seas with that colorful beak. Check these smashing photos.

Atlantic Puffin. What a bill! Photo: Ian Coleman of Quantum Tiger
Atlantic Puffin. What a bill! Photo: Ian Coleman of Quantum Tiger

Here is the punkiest of all chicks. I don’t know if this is cute or ugly. What do you think?

Is this Cute or Ugly? Little Blue Heron Chick Photo: Kelly Ricceti of Red and the Peanut

Is this Cute or Ugly? Little Blue Heron Chick Photo: Kelly Ricceti of Red and the Peanut

A crow is never just a crow. Hand on heart – do you recognise the Fish Crow?

Fish Crow. Photo: John Beetham of  A DC Birding Blog

Fish Crow. Photo: John Beetham of A DC Birding Blog

Absolutely one of the prettiest North American Warblers. Hooded Warbler. Good photos.

Hooded Warbler was a lifer for Amber Coakley of Birder's Lounge on her recent trip to Ozark Mts in Arkansas.

Hooded Warbler was a lifer for Amber Coakley of Birder's Lounge on her recent trip to Ozark Mts in Arkansas.

Birding in British Columbia – vast views of fjords and forest.

View on the Selkirk loop. British Colombia. Photo: Bob of Tales of Nishiki

View on the Selkirk loop. British Colombia. Photo: Bob of Tales of Nishiki

Reading Larry Jordan’s report with lovely photos from Audubon Outing To Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park Audubon birding trip. Photo: Larry Jordan of the birder's report

Lassen Volcanic National Park Audubon birding trip. Photo: Larry Jordan of the birder's report

Birds out my office window may not sound very exciting, but believe me it is! David Ringer’s office is in Nairobi

Rüppell’s Robin-Chat (Cossypha semirufa). Photo: David Ringer of Search and Serendipity

Rüppell’s Robin-Chat (Cossypha semirufa). Photo: David Ringer of Search and Serendipity

I want to band birds, be a waitress, and teach says Reina 5y after a visit to a banding station

Reina - A future bird-bander. Photo: Mike Powers of The Feather and the Flower

Reina - A future bird-bander. Photo: Mike Powers of The Feather and the Flower

Who done it? Want to play detective? Who killed the White-winged Dove?

Loose feathers. Who done it? Photo: Jace Stansbury of Journals of an Amateur Naturalist.

Loose feathers. Who done it? Photo: Jace Stansbury of Journals of an Amateur Naturalist.

It may be common in North America, but nevertheless the vibrant red Northern Cardinal is eyegasm

Northern Cardinal and juvenile. Photo: Vickie Henderson of Vickie Henderson Art

Northern Cardinal and juvenile. Photo: Vickie Henderson of Vickie Henderson Art

I am Cerulean with envy in spite that Mike keeps on posting BAD PHOTOS OF GOOD BIRDS – I still need it.

Fuzzy Ceruleans by Mike Bergin of 10000birds.

Fuzzy Ceruleans by Mike Bergin of 10000birds.

Redwing Blackbird courting and posing.

White-headed woodpecker swoops Clings to corneous bark of stump Disappears before my eyes – Excellent photoblog

White-headed Woodpecker. The story behind the poem. Photo: Liza Lee Miller of Birding by HappenStance. Birding just Happens.

White-headed Woodpecker. The story behind the poem. Photo: Liza Lee Miller of Birding by HappenStance. Birding just Happens.

Barred Eagle-owl takes a monkey in Singapore. Impressive!

Barred Eagle Owl takes Monkey. Photo: Rane Wong - Bird Ecology Study Group

Barred Eagle Owl takes Monkey. Photo: Rane Wong - Bird Ecology Study Group

Delaware’s first record Roseate Spoonbill was Tweeted! What a great bird.

Roseate Spoonbill first record for Delaware. Photo: Laura Kammermeier of Birds, Words, & Websites

Roseate Spoonbill first record for Delaware. Photo: Laura Kammermeier of Birds, Words, & Websites

Great shot of Brown Thornbill – a tit-like bird with a pointed fine bill from Australia.

Brown Thornbill. Great shot of an often difficult bird to photograph.  Photo: Ben Cruachan of Ben Cruachan - natural history

Brown Thornbill. Great shot of an often difficult bird to photograph. Photo: Ben Cruachan of Ben Cruachan - natural history

Birding Gamboa and Pipeline road in Panama.

Juvenil Rufescent Tiger-Heron from Gamboa, Panama. Photo: Jan Axel of Jan Axel Blog

Juvenil Rufescent Tiger-Heron from Gamboa, Panama. Photo: Jan Axel of Jan Axel Blog

I bet you never seen a Yellow-breasted Grosbeak. It’s not in the book, yet here is a photo.

"Yellow-breasted" Grosbeak - a Rose-breasted Grosbeak with xanthochroism. Photo: Seabrooke Leckie

"Yellow-breasted" Grosbeak - a Rose-breasted Grosbeak with xanthochroism. Photo: Seabrooke Leckie of The Marvelous in Nature

Tweetable headlines

Here are the short tweetable summeries with links again. Please retweet often.  I also added after each one the number of hits recieved at my posting from July 7 to July 8. The second number gives the total numbers of hits from the bit.ly link before 12 noon on July 9. Some may have been seeded earlier by others on Twitter so therefor there will be some elevated total numbers in some case. Bit.ly is a great short link system that allows you to track any link. Just write the link and add a + sign after the link.  This way you can measure the success of this blog carnival and the retweet traffic since the posting of part 1.
Time expressed as local (GMT-05:00) Bogota, Lime, Quito time zone.

  • Exquisite photos of the world’s most beautiful colorless warbler. 7 sec with a B&W Warbler. http://bit.ly/imnvC
    Tweeted at 22.55 July 7: 24 clicks . Retweeted again at 19:40 on July 8: 15 clicks. Total clicks: 78 Additional retweets: 1
  • Forget about monopoly. Here is the ultimate board game for birders. http://bit.ly/mzQbt
    Tweeted at 23.58 July 7: 21 clicks. Retweeted again at 19:41 on July 8: 31 clicks. Total clicks: 52 Additional retweets: 2
  • Good Mourning Dove and other stunning bird photos at first light a summer morning. http://bit.ly/qCY0L
    Tweeted at 00.02 July 8: 14 clicks. Total clicks: 14
  • Flying Jewels from Texas Golf Coast. Hummingbirds at Quintana Neotropical Bird Sanctuary brings memories from childhood. http://bit.ly/F7cz1
    Tweeted at 01.00 July 8: 8 clicks . Total clicks: 8
  • How to paint the Bobolink and a video of its aerial display http://bit.ly/14feaC
    Tweeted at 02.00 July 8: 16 clicks. Total clicks: 16
  • Did you know that pigeons give milk to their offspring? http://bit.ly/6ZIL2
    Tweeted at 03.00 July 8: 28 clicks. Total clicks: 28. Additional retweets: 2
  • Baby Grebes ride in the back… err.. ON the back! http://bit.ly/18Q37S
    Tweeted at 04.00 July 8: 17 clicks. Total clicks: 17
  • Mama, Feed me now. I can Swallow anything. Wonderful Haiku! http://bit.ly/o3Z9k
    Tweeted at 05.00 July 8: 20 clicks.  Total clicks: 20
  • Have you ever seen 50000 Purple Martins falll from the sky? Check out the video on this site. http://bit.ly/GdMEN
    Tweeted at 06.00 July 8: 56 clicks. Total clicks: 56. Additional retweets: 3
  • Fantastic flight shots of New Zealand Falcon by National Geography photographer Rob Suisted http://bit.ly/tfdh4
    Tweeted at 07.00 July 8: 31 clicks. Total clicks: 114 Additional retweets: 4
  • The puffin is the Toucan of the Northern seas with that colorful beak. Check these smashing photos. http://bit.ly/wYwbq
    Tweeted at 08.00 July 8: 28 clicks. Total clicks: 28 Additional retweets: 2
  • Here is the punkiest of all chicks. I don’t know if this is cute or ugly. What do you think? http://bit.ly/U7QGJ
    Tweeted at 09.00 July 8: 44 clicks. Total clicks: 88 Additional retweets: 2
  • A crow is never just a crow. Hand on heart – do you recognise the Fish Crow? http://bit.ly/ee88I
    Tweeted at 09.30 July 8: 25 clicks. Total clicks: 38 Additional retweets: 1
  • Absolutely one of the prettiest North American Warblers. Hooded Warbler. Good photos.  http://bit.ly/XpBGv
    Tweeted at 10.10 July 8: 22 clicks. Total clicks: 22
  • Birding in Britsh Columbia – vast views of fjords and forest. http://bit.ly/mLjns
    Tweeted at 10.50 July 8: 27 clicks. Total clicks: 29 Additional retweets: 2
  • Reading Larry Jordan’s report with lovely photos from Audubon Outing To Lassen Volcanic National Park http://bit.ly/lEGzy
    Tweeted at 14.11 July 8: 16 clicks. Total clicks: 19
  • Birds out my office window may not sound very exciting, but believe me it is! David Ringer’s office is in Nairobi http://bit.ly/YEpEa
    Tweeted at 14:44 July 8: 9 clicks. Total clicks: 33
  • I want to band birds, be a waitress, and teach says Reina 5y after a visit to a banding station http://bit.ly/ykVWe
    Tweeted at 15:25 July 8: 16 clicks. Total clicks: 16
  • Who done it? Want to play detective? Who killed the White-winged Dove? http://bit.ly/EOrqB
    Tweeted at 16.08 July 8: 15 clicks.  Total clicks: 15
  • It may be common in North America, but nevertheless the vibrant red Northern Cardinal is eyegasm http://bit.ly/t37Rl
    Tweeted at  16.38 July 8: 24 clicks. Total clicks: 25
  • I am Cerulean with envy in spiite that Mike keeps on posting BAD PHOTOS OF GOOD BIRDS – I still need it. http://bit.ly/aUwiy
    Tweeted at 17.08 July 8: 25 clicks. Total clicks: 25
  • Redwing Blackbird courting and posing. http://bit.ly/X8k4o
    Tweeted at 17.40 July 8: 16 clicks. Total clicks: 16
  • White-headed woodpecker swoops Clings to corneous bark of stump Disappears before my eyes – Excellent photoblog http://bit.ly/f4bka
    Tweeted at 18.20 July 8: 24 clicks. Total clicks: 24
  • Barred Eagle-owl takes a monkey in Singapore. Impressive! http://bit.ly/hTzF4
    Tweeted at 18.50 July 7: 28 clicks. Total clicks: 28 Additional retweets: 1
  • Delaware’s first record Roseate Spoonbill was Tweeted! What a great bird. http://bit.ly/3nf6f
    Tweeted at 19.30 July 8: 18 clicks. Total clicks: 59
  • Great shot of Brown Thornbill – a tit-like bird with a pointed fine bill from Australia. http://bit.ly/12PlXD
    Tweeted at 20.00 July 8: 18 clicks. Total clicks: 18
  • Birding Gamboa and Pipeline road in Panama. http://bit.ly/IIh1K
    Tweeted at 20.40 July 8: 11 clicks. Total clicks: 11
  • I bet you never seen a Yellow-breasted Grosbeak. It’s not in the book, yet here is a photo. http://bit.ly/3MbcA4
    Tweeted at 21.20 July 8: 60 clicks. Total clicks: 60. Additional Retweets. 5

Studying this list we learn 2 things.

  1. Those post that are re-tweeted have considerably larger number of hits. Lesson learnt: Retweet often. Those bloggers that you retweet will be in re-tweet dept to you!
  2. I have followers all over the world. This means that not all of my followers will be on Twitter at the same time. You can very well re-tweet your own message of a blog post several times per day, if you are in a similar position.  I have peaks at 3 AM (Europe wakes up/arrive to work and get connected), 6-9.30 AM (US /Canada wake up),  a fairly good peak around 5-7 pm and a very good peak around when posting just after 9 PM (US/Canada logged in coast to coast to coast). Remember all my times are (-5 GMT).

Use this info and start re-tweeting the posts presented here and resend your own blog posts one more time to Twitter.

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Message to the bloggers taking part in this issue of IATB.

OMG!* I am the host. Everyone says this is a great way to get one’s blog discovered by fellow bloggers. Cool! But when it comes down to numbers, is it really productive for anyone to participate in a blog carnival? Do you get any extra clicks to your blog, because you participate in I and the bird – or other blog carnivals. UPDATE: Obviously, not complaining as a host.  I am know this will bring some traffic to the blog. I am concerned for the participants.

Here are the brutal facts. My participation in 10 different issues of IATB have provided  less than 50 clicks in total. Fellow bloggers, you are usually fast to comment in the comment section, but do you click through? I know most of you have read many of the blogs before they are published, so OK, you are excused.  Fact remains, blog carnivals do not generate a lot of visits to your blog. Mike Bergin argued that it does give back links which is true, but backlinks are usually most important if you are trying to get good google rating for specific keywords and you actually sell something. If you just want readers to your nature blog you shall find that backlinks in blog carnivals have hardly any value what so ever.
During my short period as a blogger I have also been privileged to be guest blogger both on NatureBlogNetwork and Birdchick. One would have thought that these popular blogs would have brought excellent traffic. But only a handful hits from each. I am not trying to be an ungrateful smart-ass, I am just calling fellow nature bloggers to some reflection. How can we really help each other to better traffic? It is clear that both blog carnivals and guest blogging fail the original purpose.

We need to help each other to get readers. This is not a narcissistic cry for help screaming “look at me”! (I know I come across this way sometimes!!).  I want more readers to find the great variety of nature related stories that are being told. Why? This is part of a religion if you like. It is ultimately about saving souls. We need more souls caring for nature. We need to inspire more people to discover the wonders of nature. We need an army of nature lovers. Only then can we build a better and greener future. We are living on the edge of ecological catastrophe. That is the reason why your blog needs more readers. Even if you are only writing and posting pictures for your own enjoyment and those closest to you, you are still part of this movement. And if you decided to participate in this issue of “I and the bird”, was it not because you were thinking some more people should read what I have written?

Message to all other people who find their way here.

This is a collection of articles by naturebloggers about birds. I and the bird is given every 2 weeks and presents some of the finest bird blogging there is. It is  like a “Bird Bloggers digest” and something of an institution. But as an old institution, this is issue #104,  it is also perhaps getting a bit dusty. I decided to put some live into this issue and to modernize it somewhat. I am  interested this time to find a new way for the participants to get visitors to their blogs.

Here is the strategy.

1.  Use social media to let people know about your blog. Each participant will be tweeted, facebooked, stumbled and dugg.

2.  A great title for each blog. When tweeting not many people will check out if one only writes: “New Blog post…check it out here!”. Try some superlatives. Such as “The world’s most beautiful colorless Warbler”

3. I am not going to try to outsmart all the previous “I and the Bird” deliveries. I am not writing this in my native language and therefor I don’t have vocabulary to impress you with a very literate piece. And I don’t have a smart thread or story to tie around the contributions. This is going to be remembered being the most boring “I and the Bird” in history. But if I can help it, you shall get some visitors to your site.

4.  A great clickable photo from each article will hopefully invite to click through. Click on the photo and you will arrive at the blog. This is getting a bit long (so the photo section will be presented in the part 2 of  I and the bird #104.

Here are the participants presented one-by-one in a twitter-friendly format. Your job is to:

1. Read every blogpost. When you have read it – please Digg it and/or Stumble-Upon (preparing another blogpost on the social bookmarking services)
2. Retweet the headline of each blogpost together with the short link. You could just copy and paste of course…or try to come up with a catchier title than mine. Remember you have 140 characters to use.

  • Exquisite photos of the world’s most beautiful colorless warbler. 7 sec with a B&W Warbler. http://bit.ly/imnvC
  • Forget about monopoly. Here is the ultimate board game for birders. http://bit.ly/mzQbt
  • Good Mourning Dove and other stunning bird photos at first light a summer morning. http://bit.ly/qCY0L
  • Flying Jewels from Texas Golf Coast. Hummingbirds at Quintana Neotropical Bird Sanctuary brings memories from childhood. http://bit.ly/F7cz1
  • How to paint the Bobolink and a video of its aerial display http://bit.ly/14feaC
  • Did you know that pigeons give milk to their offspring? http://bit.ly/6ZIL2
  • Baby Grebes ride in the back… err.. ON the back! http://bit.ly/18Q37S
  • Mama, Feed me now. I can Swallow anything. Wonderful Haiku! http://bit.ly/o3Z9k
  • Have you ever seen 50000 Purple Martins falll from the sky? Check out the video on this site. http://bit.ly/GdMEN
  • Fantastic flight shots of New Zealand Falcon by National Geography photographer Rob Suisted http://bit.ly/tfdh4
  • The puffin is the Toucan of the Northern seas with that colorful beak. Check these smashing photos. http://bit.ly/wYwbq
  • Here is the punkiest of all chicks. I don’t know if this is cute or ugly. What do you think? http://bit.ly/U7QGJ
  • A crow is never just a crow. Hand on heart – do you recognise the Fish Crow? http://bit.ly/ee88I
  • Absolutely one of the prettiest North American Warblers. Hooded Warbler. Good photos. http://bit.ly/XpBGv
  • Birding in Britsh Columbia – vast views of fjords and forest. http://bit.ly/mLjns
  • Reading Larry Jordan’s report with lovely photos from Audubon Outing To Lassen Volcanic National Park http://bit.ly/lEGzy
  • Birds out my office window may not sound very exciting, but believe me it is! David Ringer’s office is in Nairobi http://bit.ly/YEpEa
  • I want to band birds, be a waitress, and teach says Reina 5y after a visit to a banding station http://bit.ly/ykVWe
  • Who done it? Want to play detective? Who killed the White-winged Dove? http://bit.ly/EOrqB
  • It may be common in North America, but nevertheless the vibrant red Northern Cardinal is eyegasm http://bit.ly/t37Rl
  • I am Cerulean with envy in spite that Mike keeps on posting BAD PHOTOS OF GOOD BIRDS – I still need it. http://bit.ly/aUwiy
  • Red-winged Blackbird courting and posing. http://bit.ly/X8k4o
  • White-headed woodpecker swoops Clings to corneous bark of stump Disappears before my eyes – Excellent photoblog http://bit.ly/f4bka
  • Barred Eagle-owl takes a monkey in Singapore. Impressive! http://bit.ly/hTzF4
  • Delaware’s first record Roseate Spoonbill was Tweeted! What a great bird. http://bit.ly/3nf6f
  • Great shot of Brown Thornbill – a tit-like bird with a pointed fine bill from Australia. http://bit.ly/12PlXD
  • Birding Gamboa and Pipeline road in Panama. http://bit.ly/IIh1K
  • I bet you never seen a Yellow-breasted Grosbeak. It’s not in the book, yet here is a photo. http://bit.ly/3MbcA4

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